Everyone at our practice is committed to providing you with the very best in pet healthcare. Our devotion and dedication to caring for animals is evident in and outside of work and so our veterinary team bring a wealth of experience to the practice. They have individually obtained high standards of professional qualifications making them all best placed to contribute to the Braemar Veterinary standard we pride ourselves in delivering.

Shane Murray 

Kate Fitzpatrick 

Danielle Magill 

Owner of the Practice - Shane qualified from Glasgow University as a vet in 1997. He opened the doors of Braemar Veterinary Clinic in September 2005. He has practiced in England and Australia and thoroughly enjoys the thrills and challenges that come with running a veterinary practice. In his spare time, of which he doesn’t have much, he takes pleasure in the odd game of golf, reading, and jogging. He has a cat called Sue who resides at the clinic and keeps an eye on things.

Full-time Vet - Kate qualified in Edinburgh University in 1999 and came to star working in mixed animal practice before coming to Braemar in 2007.   Kate lives in Bangor with her daughter Ella and has two cats Monkey and Baggy who are regulars here at the Braemar cattery when Kate’s off on holidays.  Kate and Ella enjoy winter skiing and summer sailing.  In 2015 she was nominated for Vet of the Year in the prestigious Pet Plan Awards.

Danielle qualified from University College Dublin in 2005 and came to Braemar after working for six years in a mixed animal practice.  Danielle enjoys walking on the beaches close to her home with her Golden Labrador called Doris.  Last year she passed her small animal exams and is now Danielle Magill GP Cert (SAM) MRCVS.  Congratulations Danielle !

Judith Evans 

Lesley O’Neill 

Roisin McClenaghan 

Judith came to the Practice in 2013 following many years working in the health industry and a lifetime shared with animals.   The opportunity to work in a veterinary practice fits well with her passion for all things four legged!  She shares her home with a small menagerie of children, ponies dogs and cats and comes to work for a rest!

Lesley qualified as a veterinary nurse in 2008 at Greenmount College and has been working in mixed practice in Northern Ireland before coming to Braemar.  In 2015 Lesley was awarded the coveted Hills Veterinary Nurse of the Year.  Lesley has a particular interest in all things feline and loves caring for all the cats in our cattery.  When she’s not at Braemar you will find Lesley taking care of her horse Ben or chillaxing with her cats and little terrier Sally

Dog loving lady Roisin, qualified as a Veterinary Nurse at Greenmount College and has worked in veterinary practices in England and Northern Ireland, and is an experienced horse rider. She can’t imagine life without animals, and according to her mum, Roisi¬n has loved animals from childhood & has always had a house full of pets. The owner of doggies, Cara, Scrappy and specs, Roisin spends her free time gardening, playing football and walking her dog

Probably more than for any other pet, before you buy an exotic animal, you should do a lot of preparation. Begin by finding out as much as you can about the animal - read books, talk to other owners. Whilst time consuming, this preparatory work will help both you and the animal in the long run. To get you started, consider the following topics:

Choosing An Exotic Pet

One of the first decisions you need to make is which type of exotic pet do I choose. Consider your experience, the help available and the environment you are able to create for your pet before choosing. Obviously you also need to consider the animal itself. Some are relatively easy to care for where others should be avoided at all costs. Again, plenty of research is required.

Feeding

Ensuring that your exotic pet receives a balanced diet which provides all the nutrition it needs is vital.

On the whole, exotic pets which eat whole vertebrates are less of a worry as the get all of there nutritional needs from their prey. Insect or fruit eating pets may need extra vitamins added to their diet.

The key once again is good, solid research. Find out what diet your pet requires and how often it should be fed.

Environment

Clearly you should have understood the environmental needs of your pet and have set the environment up before you bring your exotic animal home.

Some animals require very much more effort to house than others - requiring a greater commitment from you. The best thing, once again, is to do your homework up front. The factors you need to consider are:

Space
Do you have enough available space? Arboreal (tree dwelling) reptiles and amphibians need more space than terrestrial species.

Habitat
For some exotic pets it is necessary to simulate the habitat it would naturally encounter in the wild.

Temperature
You might need to provide a range of temperatures within the environment to allow the animal to control their body temperature by moving from a cold spot to a hot spot.

Lighting
Your exotic animal may very well require ultraviolet lighting as well as access to unfiltered sunlight.