Everyone at our practice is committed to providing you with the very best in pet healthcare. Our devotion and dedication to caring for animals is evident in and outside of work and so our veterinary team bring a wealth of experience to the practice. They have individually obtained high standards of professional qualifications making them all best placed to contribute to the Braemar Veterinary standard we pride ourselves in delivering.

Shane Murray 

Kate Fitzpatrick 

Danielle Magill 

Owner of the Practice - Shane qualified from Glasgow University as a vet in 1997. He opened the doors of Braemar Veterinary Clinic in September 2005. He has practiced in England and Australia and thoroughly enjoys the thrills and challenges that come with running a veterinary practice. In his spare time, of which he doesn’t have much, he takes pleasure in the odd game of golf, reading, and jogging. He has a cat called Sue who resides at the clinic and keeps an eye on things.

Full-time Vet - Kate qualified in Edinburgh University in 1999 and came to star working in mixed animal practice before coming to Braemar in 2007.   Kate lives in Bangor with her daughter Ella and has two cats Monkey and Baggy who are regulars here at the Braemar cattery when Kate’s off on holidays.  Kate and Ella enjoy winter skiing and summer sailing.  In 2015 she was nominated for Vet of the Year in the prestigious Pet Plan Awards.

Danielle qualified from University College Dublin in 2005 and came to Braemar after working for six years in a mixed animal practice.  Danielle enjoys walking on the beaches close to her home with her Golden Labrador called Doris.  Last year she passed her small animal exams and is now Danielle Magill GP Cert (SAM) MRCVS.  Congratulations Danielle !

Judith Evans 

Lesley O’Neill 

Roisin McClenaghan 

Judith came to the Practice in 2013 following many years working in the health industry and a lifetime shared with animals.   The opportunity to work in a veterinary practice fits well with her passion for all things four legged!  She shares her home with a small menagerie of children, ponies dogs and cats and comes to work for a rest!

Lesley qualified as a veterinary nurse in 2008 at Greenmount College and has been working in mixed practice in Northern Ireland before coming to Braemar.  In 2015 Lesley was awarded the coveted Hills Veterinary Nurse of the Year.  Lesley has a particular interest in all things feline and loves caring for all the cats in our cattery.  When she’s not at Braemar you will find Lesley taking care of her horse Ben or chillaxing with her cats and little terrier Sally

Dog loving lady Roisin, qualified as a Veterinary Nurse at Greenmount College and has worked in veterinary practices in England and Northern Ireland, and is an experienced horse rider. She can’t imagine life without animals, and according to her mum, Roisi¬n has loved animals from childhood & has always had a house full of pets. The owner of doggies, Cara, Scrappy and specs, Roisin spends her free time gardening, playing football and walking her dog

More than half of UK households have a pet in residence. Cats seem to be the most popular pets at 8 million with dogs not far behind in number at 6 million. There are about 3500 veterinary practices that specialise in treating every type of animal from horses and cows to ferrets and hamsters.

Veterinary practices are improving their services all the time and as human medicine progresses some of the diagnostic techniques and treatments find their way into veterinary practice. Most practices now have wide ranging facilities such as hospitalisation with general anaesthetic facilities and ultrasound scanning. Treatment costs do not come cheap and repairing broken bones following an accident to a favourite Dalmatian can soon exceed £1,000 or more. This may come as quite a shock and cause a payment problem. It is not surprising therefore that more and more pet owners are taking out insurance policies. Dogs and cats can be insured with most policies costing no more than a few pounds a month.

When To Take Out A Policy

The same rules apply to buying a pet policy as your own health insurance policy - buy it when young and healthy and there are no existing conditions to report. Read the small print carefully and take particular notice of the terms and conditions that will explain what is and what is not covered together with any excess payments that may be required.

What Do You Get For Your Money?

In general, diagnosis and treatment for any accident, injury, or illness, will be covered by the policy. However pre-existing and chronic conditions will almost certainly be excluded or subject to an excess. Understandably any insurance policy with a high claim likelihood has to maintain a careful balance between premium level, excess charges and exclusions for the insurer to remain in business.

As in human medicine a very large number of sophisticated diagnostic tests are available. Some will require the services of a laboratory, for example blood and urine samples to test for the presence of infection, diabetes or metabolic disturbances. X-rays and ultrasound scanning are other commonly used diagnostic procedures. Rapid diagnosis is vitally important in the treatment of any illness and diagnostic tests may have to be carried out at intervals to monitor the success of the treatment or antibiotics being prescribed for an infection.

Cats and dogs stray on to roadways and frequently have to undergo hospitalisation following an accident. X-rays, transfusions and major surgery involving the placement of metal implants, screws and plates to restore the function of shattered bones all require expensive resources. An insurance policy in these circumstances will bring peace of mind.

Rare and unusual conditions such as leukaemia or cancer may have to be referred to a University establishment or specialists for treatment. Advanced cancer diagnosis and treatment can be given, for instance at Cambridge University and the Animal Health Trust at Newmarket.

Third Party Liability

This is an important benefit to protect pet owners against being sued if their pet causes damage or injury. This can be either a dog biting a child or a cat causing a road accident.

Premium Levels

As with most types of insurance premiums will vary according to risk. A valuable pedigree will command a much higher premium than farmyard breeds! Post Codes will also be taken into account and proximity to built up areas of towns and cities.

Exclusions

Routine and preventive care will be excluded together with anything classed as "cosmetic" for example surgery to correct a bite abnormality in a dog. All pre-existing conditions.

Summary

Veterinary insurance has become much more popular in recent years and there are a variety of plans to choose from. The national British Small Animal Veterinary Association endorses the concept of Pet Health Insurance and almost all veterinary practices display Pet Insurance leaflets and actively recommend it. The ongoing progress of veterinary medicine means that costs will continue to rise. An insurance policy is a sensible way in which to begin planning for unforeseen bills that could be very significant.